Skydiving Life Insurance Questions

Insurance: Is you head in the clouds or in the sand?

Skydiving life insurance isn’t something that we like to think about as skydivers. There are a number of reasons for this.

Some of us don’t want to be negative, and think of the worst. The superstitious among us might start psyching themselves out when they consider the law of attraction and negative energy.

Many of us have a ‘hell yeah’ kick-ass bullet proof, it’ll never happen to me mentality. Then there are the hedonistic ones who think “when your time’s up, your time’s up”.

I’d like to think that you’re one of the last group who knows that statistically, the risks are very low. Added to the fact that you take skydiving seriously, prepare carefully, and never ever dive when under the influence of drugs or alcohol… Right?

We all know that the handful of skydiving deaths every year is tiny when we compare it to the main killers. Skydiving is infinitely safer than cigarettes, alcohol, prescription drugs, cars, motorbikes, being in the home kitchen etc etc.

So, skydiving is safe, and life insurance for skydiving is a waste of money, right?

Wrong.

Do you have skydiving Life insurance?

The problem arises when we discount risk factors in our insurance applications. If we lie, and neglect to put the full truth on our life insurance applications then we risk voiding them.

For example, if you neglect to tell a car insurer that you’ve modified the engine for performance, guess what – This might mean that you get nothing from the insurance company after you crash.

If you omit any so-called dangerous hobbies on your life insurance application, guess what… Your loved ones might be faced with a rejection, financial hardship and a final example of how you didn’t look after them enough… Ouch…

If you have skydiving life insurance, and you’ve lied (yes, a lie of omission is a lie), you ought to contact them right now. It’s possible that your life insurance will be voided because many insurers don’t insure for dangerous sports and hobbies. They might even raise your premium by a few dollars per year. Isn’t it worth it for a bit of piece of mind though?

Imagine experiencing an equipment failure mid descent, your buddies are a bit too far away to help, you’re running out of time. Then, your life flashes before your eyes, you think “this is it”. Will you think of your family? Your life insurance?

It’s likely that you’ve been in a life or death situation before, perhaps during skydiving, perhaps not. For a bit of time and effort, you need to investigate whether you’re covered for skydiving or not.

But here’s the biggest reason:

Do you believe that good preparation and discipline are essential to safety? Not just to safety, but to the flow of the experience, and the jump day itself? I do. I believe that good nutrition, a decent nights sleep, correct clothing, decent weather all add together to make the next jump the best one ever. No single factor is responsible, its an accumulation of all the factors involved. Skydiving insurance is one of these things.

Skydive operators have their necessary permits and insurances, in fact all businesses do. They’re forced to by government mandate. No-one is forcing you to be diligent, but your own flight checklist should include insurance.

There are many companies who won’t insure you for dangerous sports. There are other companies that charge a little more based on the number of times you take part every year. There are also companies that offer specific skydiving life insurance.

If any of this has seemed relevant and true, and if you aren’t 100% sure that you’re covered for life insurance as a skydiver, take action now. Right now before you forget. You might not have time to regret it as you plummet to the ground, but your family will have decades.

Credit: The awesome photo at the top of the page is by Filipe Dos Santos Mendes on Unsplash

Author: Jenny Walker

......... I am a sensible yet crazy girl who loves life. Into anything exciting or adventurous! MWUAH!

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